Voice over IP (VoIP) is a methodology and group of technologies for the delivery of voice communications and multimedia sessions over Internet Protocol (IP) networks, such as the Internet. Other terms commonly associated with VoIP are IP telephony, Internet telephony, broadband telephony, and broadband phone service.

VoIP solutions aimed at businesses have evolved into unified communications services that treat all communications—phone calls, faxes, voice mail, e-mail, Web conferences, and more—as discrete units that can all be delivered via any means and to any handset, including cellphones. Two kinds of competitors are competing in this space: one set is focused on VoIP for medium to large enterprises, while another is targeting the small-to-medium business (SMB) market.

VoIP can be a benefit for reducing communication and infrastructure costs. Examples include:

  • Routing phone calls over existing data networks to avoid the need for separate voice and data networks.
  • The ability to transmit more than one telephone call over a single broadband connection.
  • Secure calls using standardized protocols (such asSecure Real-time Transport Protocol). Most of the difficulties of creating a secure telephone connection over traditional phone lines, such as digitizing and digital transmission, are already in place with VoIP. It is only necessary to encrypt and authenticate the existing data stream.
  • Utilized existing network infrastructure to minimize the operating cost.
  • Eliminating the need of hiring personnel to greet and distribute incoming calls with the use of aVirtual PBX
  • VoIP can be scaled easy, allowing it to grow with the business without restrictive contracts